Tuesday 6 February 2024

Glasswinged Butterfly

 


Time for another creature and this week we are in South America and the creature is the Glasswinged Butterfly, I have never heard of it till I opened my book and saw it.

Unlike other butterflies which have colourful, patterned wings designed to warn off predators these ones do not. Instead they are pretty much invisible as its wings are all but transparent.

If you thought that was cool how about the fact that their 6cm wide wings can carry around 40 times it's own weight and it is also a damn fast flyer at speeds of up to 13km an hour.



The glasswinged butterfly is most commonly found from Central to South America as far south as Chile, with appearances as north as Mexico and Texas. This butterfly thrives in the tropical conditions of the rainforests in the Central and South American countries.

The adult glasswinged butterfly can be identified by its transparent wings with opaque, dark brown borders tinted with red or orange. Their bodies are a dark brown colour. The butterflies are 2.8 to 3.0 centimetres (1.1 to 1.2 in) long and have a wingspan of 5.6 to 6.1 centimetres (2.2 to 2.4 in)

14 comments:

  1. Wow, it is so beautiful. Thank you for sharing this butterfly with me.

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  2. Nature has its way of surprising us with the diversity and adaptability of its creations. Thank you for sharing this interesting tidbit about the Glasswinged Butterfly from South America!

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  3. It certainly is a beauty Jo-Anne.

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  4. You know I have seen them and just like you say - THEY ARE GORGEGOUS - another gift from God.

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  5. What a remarkable and unique butterfly, Jo-Anne. Thanks for introducing us!

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  6. OMGosh! They are beautiful!! :)

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  7. First look, I thought it was a dollar store deco. I'd probably quit drinking if I ever saw one!

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