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All photos on this blog posted either in the past, the present or future are the property of me Jo-Anne Meadows and can not be used by anyone else for anything else without my written permission.

Friday, 21 November 2014

Five Things Friday...................No Internet


Good afternoon all it is another bloody hot day in my part of the world, well it has been a while since I have been around blogland. This is because I had no internet for 3 days, it was late yesterday afternoon when we got it back and I was just so worn out then that I didn't feel like doing a post.

Also I am unable to get into my emails so unable to read all the blogs I follow via email, so over the next week I am going to try and get to your blogs and resubscribe using a different email address.

Anyway here are this weeks 5 things for this bloody hot Friday.

Christmas decorations going up but more I want to do

Leo excited to see all the decorations

Starting to write my Christmas cards

Feeling like there is so much I want to do and so little time to do it all


Feeling to tired to make a start on things I want to do

Sunday, 16 November 2014

52 Years ago today I came into the world


Today is my birthday it was 52 years ago at 4.05pm on a Friday afternoon that I was born. I came into the world 6 weeks early and as such I was in a humidicrib for 4 weeks weighing only 4lb 2oz's, I was only 12 inches long.

I was 5 weeks old when I was able to go home with mum and dad. However, that was not the end of my time in hospital at 3 months of age my parents were in a car accident I suffered a fractured skull and was in hospital for about 5 days along with my dad, then at 6 months of age I was hospitalised with pneumonia I was in hospital for 6 days that time.

I was so tiny and frail when I was born that the doctors thought I wouldn't survive the night and because of that my nanna wanted me to be baptised so I was baptised when I was only hours old.

A number of years after my birth my mum had a there but for the grace of God thought about me, you see when mum was pregnant with me she suffered terrible morning sickness and was prescribed thalidomide but mum felt funny taking anything while pregnant she just didn't feel right about it and decided against taking it. Of course thalidomide has since been linked with birth defects, so I am lucky that mum didn't take the drug.

I was an only child till I was around 6 years old when mum & dad had my sister Jeannie followed by my sister Sue and then of course when I was 15 they had Sandra and then David.



Friday, 14 November 2014

Five Things Friday..............Heat


Here is this weeks Five things

Bloody stinking hot.......it is currently 34°c aka 93°f
down from a top of 40°c aka 104°f

Tim stuck in a bus all day without air conditioning

Three air conditioners going in the house

Sore and swollen feet due to the heat

A cool bath at the end of the day



Thursday, 13 November 2014

Laptop problems



Afternoon all, another lovely day here in my part of the world. Well I am having computer problems, yesterday I was using the laptop and it started making a strange noise it sounded like the fan. Well after about 15 minutes it shut down and wouldn't reboot, I left it for a little while and tried to reboot it and it has been going alright since.

So I go and tell Tim that it is stuffed and I will need a new laptop, I was expecting him to complain but he didn't instead he tells me he was planning on getting me a new laptop for my birthday anyway.


Yes it is my birthday on Sunday I will be 52yrs old damn how did that happen.............

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month...............came into place in 1918


Good morning world it is the 11th November in my part of the world also known as Armistice or Remembrance Day when on the 11th hour we have a minute of silence to remember all those who have died in wars. It was 2 minutes but many places only require a minute silence nowadays.

At 11 am on 11 November 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years continuous warfare. The allied armies had driven the German invaders back, having inflicted heavy defeats upon them over the preceding four months. In November the Germans called for an armistice (suspension of fighting) in order to secure a peace settlement. They accepted the allied terms of unconditional surrender.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month attained a special significance in the post-war years. The moment when hostilities ceased on the Western Front became universally associated with the remembrance of those who had died in the war. This first modern world conflict had brought about the mobilisation of over 70 million people and left between 9 and 13 million dead, perhaps as many as one-third of them with no known grave. The allied nations chose this day and time for the commemoration of their war dead.
On the first anniversary of the armistice in 1919 two minutes' silence was instituted as part of the main commemorative ceremony at the new Cenotaph in London. The silence was proposed by Australian journalist Edward Honey, who was working in Fleet Street. At about the same time, a South African statesman made a similar proposal to the British Cabinet, which endorsed it.

King George V personally requested all the people of the British Empire to suspend normal activities for two minutes on the hour of the armistice "which stayed the worldwide carnage of the four preceding years and marked the victory of Right and Freedom". The two minutes' silence was popularly adopted and it became a central feature of commemorations on Armistice Day.
On the second anniversary of the armistice in 1920 the commemoration was given added significance when it became a funeral, with the return of the remains of an unknown soldier from the battlefields of the Western Front.
Most other allied nations adopted the tradition of entombing unknown soldiers over the following decade.

After the end of the Second World War, the Australian and British governments changed the name to Remembrance Day. Armistice Day was no longer an appropriate title for a day which would commemorate all war dead. However, many Australians still call the day Armistice Day I know I do.
In Australia on the 75th anniversary of the armistice in 1993 Remembrance Day ceremonies again became the focus of national attention. The remains of an unknown Australian soldier, exhumed from a First World War military cemetery in France, were ceremonially entombed in the Memorial's Hall of Memory.

Remembrance Day ceremonies were conducted simultaneously in towns and cities all over the country, culminating at the moment of burial at 11 am and coinciding with the traditional two minutes' silence. This ceremony, which touched a chord across the Australian nation, re-established Remembrance Day as a significant day of commemoration.
Four years later, in 1997, Governor-General Sir William Deane issued a proclamation formally declaring 11 November to be Remembrance Day, urging all Australians to observe one minute's silence at 11 am on 11 November each year to remember those who died or suffered for Australia's cause in all wars and armed conflicts.
The Flanders poppy has long been part of the day, the poppies were among the first plants to spring up in the devastated battlefields in France and Belgium.
For many soldiers the red colour of the poppy came from the blood of their fallen comrades which was soaked into the ground.

It didn't take long for the poppy to be accepted as the flower of remembrance and is usually worn on Armistice Day. They were first sold for Armistice Day in 1921 by The Australian Returned Soldiers and Sailors Imperial League (later became known as the RSL). Those first silk poppies were made in French orphanages and imported to Australia they sold for a shilling with five pence was donated to a charity for French children and a six pence went to the League's own welfare work.
Today the RSL continues to sell poppies for Remembrance Day to raise funds for its welfare work.
Poppies adorn the panels of the Memorial's Roll of Honour, placed beside names as a small personal tribute to the memory of a particular person, or to any of the thousands of individuals commemorated there.

This practice began at the interment of the Unknown Australian Soldier on 11 November 1993. As people waited to lay a single flower by his tomb in the Hall of Memory, they had to queue along the cloisters, beside the Roll of Honour. By the end of the day, hundreds of RSL poppies had been pushed into the cracks between the panels bearing the names of the fallen.



Monday, 10 November 2014

The Distinguished Service Order


Today I am going to talk a little about military medals and decorations, starting with The Distinguished Service Order also know as the DSO it is a military decoration of the United Kingdom and formerly of other parts of the Commonwealth and British Empire.
It was awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. It was instituted on the 2nd September 1886 by Queen Victoria and was awarded for the first time on the 25th November 1886.

It is typically awarded to officers ranked mayor or higher, but the honour has sometimes been awarded to especially valorous junior officers. During the First World War, 8,981 DSOs were awarded, each award being announced in the London Gazette.

Between the years of 1914 and 1916 it was awarded to staff officers who did not serve under fire after the 1st January 1917 commanders in the field were instructed to recommend this award only for those serving under fire.

Prior to 1943 is was only given to someone mentioned in despatches, the order is generally given to officers in command above the rank of captain. When a junior officer was awarded the DSO it was often regarded as an acknowledgement that the officer had only just missed out on the Victoria Cross.

In 1942 the award started to be given to officers of the Merchant Navy who had performed acts of gallantry under fire and enemy attack.

Since 1993 the award has been restricted solely to distinguished service such as leadership and command by and rank, the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross was introduced as the seconded highest award for gallantry. It has,however, remained an officers-only award and it has yet to be awarded to non-commissioned rank.

Recipients of he order are officially know as Companions of the Distinguished Service Order. They are entitled to use the letters “DSO”. One of more gold medal bars ornamented by the Crown may be issued to the DSO holders performing further acts of such leadership which would have merited award of the DSO. The bars are worn as clasps on the medal ribbon of the original award.

No you may be wondering what it looks like well I could tell you but I think it is better to just show you so here it is.

I will write more about other medals in other posts. 

Sunday, 9 November 2014

Sunday Lunch........aka.......a full house


Good afternoon all, it is another bloody warm day here in my part of the world and what a day I have had, I spent the morning doing housework and then I have been cooking for lunch.

I have my 4 girls here for lunch and all the grandchildren along with Daemon so the house has been loud and chaotic and the house now looks a right mess.

I spent the last 2 nights at my brother's place dog sitting but I left early to come home this morning as I knew the house would be a right mess and I would have to clean before the family has turned up.

I also managed to read about 30 odd blogs while cooking and cleaning.

Kathy has had a problem with Sydney-May not wanting to leave, first we couldn't find Sydney-May's shoes then when the shoes were found she put them on but started to whinge because she didn't want to leave. Kathy may have a problem getting her daughters to leave but I have a problem getting my youngest daughter to leave....................lol

I am looking forward to having a quiet house after they all leave, I then will get to put something on other than cartoons.


I also want to work on some posts for the coming week I like to have a few there ready to be used when I am too busy to write a post.